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Dublin Hospitals in 1916

DR STEEVENS’ HOSPITAL

Dr Richard Steevens (1653-1710), President of the Royal College of Physicians at the time of his death, bequeathed his estate worth a large fortune to his twin sister, Grizelda. It was to be used to provide for her own needs during her life time, and on her death, a hospital was to be built with the remainder. Madam Grizelda decided to have the hospital built in her own lifetime. Thomas Burgh drew up a set of plans which were completed by Sir Edward Lovett Pearce. A site was purchased on the street now named Steevens’ Lane facing Heuston Station. The whole procedure spanned several years and the hospital was not opened until 1733. Edward Worth, one of the most eminent Dublin physicians of his day and also governor of the hospital, died in 1732 bequeathing £1,000, his library, valued at £5,000, together with £100 for fitting it up. Grizelda Steevens lived in the building until her death in 1747 at the age of 92. In 1857 the Dublin School of Medicine was transferred to Dr. Steevens' Hospital and renamed Steevens' Hospital Medical College. Dr Steevens’ served as a public hospital until it was closed in 1987. Sold in 1988, it reopened in 1992 as the Headquarters of the Eastern Health Board, a function which it still serves.

Source:

Encyclopaedia of Dublin, Douglas Bennett, 2005

JERVIS ST HOSPITAL

Jervis St Hospital was first established as the ‘Charitable Infirmary’ by six doctors (George & Francis Duany, Patrick Kelly, Nathaniel Handson, John Dowdall & Peter Brennan) in 1718 in Dublin’s Cook Street. It moved to Inns Quay in 1728 and finally to Jervis Street in 1796 on part of the site of number 14, formerly the home of James 1st Earl of Charlemont. The Sisters of Mercy took over the hospital in 1854. It was rebuilt in 1877 to become known as Jervis Street Hospital and Charitable Infirmary, one of the city’s main casualty hospitals. It was again enlarged in 1886 and an out-patients department added in 1910. More casualties of the 1916 rising in Dublin were transferred by Tara Street ambulance to Jervis Street Hospital than to any of the other local hospitals used during ‘Easter Week’. The hospital was closed in 1987. Today the Jervis St Shopping Centre is located on the site.

Source:

Encyclopaedia of Dublin, Douglas Bennett, 2005

MEATH HOSPITAL

The Meath Hospital, Dublin, was founded in 1753 by a group of ‘well disposed persons’, who judged that an institution of this nature was much wanted in the western side of the city – the Earl of Meath’s Liberties – to treat its industrious poor. The hospital had a number of addresses before its present site on Long Lane & Heytesbury Street was purchased from the Dean & Chapter of St Patrick’s Cathedral. In the 19th century the Meath Hospital achieved world-wide fame as a result of the revolutionary teaching methods and groundbreaking research carried out by Graves and Stokes, physicians of the hospital. Along with the Adelaide, Harcourt Street, Mercer’s, Dr Steevens’, Sir Patrick Dun’s, Royal City of Dublin (Baggott Street) hospitals the Meath was incorporated into The Federated Dublin Voluntary Hospitals group established in November 1961. This group moved to a new hospital in Tallaght in south County Dublin. In 1998 the old Meath Hospital was bought by the South West Health Board (formerly Eastern Health Board). Today the centre on Heytesbury Street is called the Meath Community Hospital and currently provides long-stay residential places to older people responding to the needs of the local community. It also runs a day care service.

Source:

Encyclopaedia of Dublin, Douglas Bennett, 2005
www.irishnursinghomes.ie/IrishNursingHomes/HSEDublinMidLeinster/Dublin/2267

MERCER’S HOSPITAL

Originally, Mercer’s Hospital was a large private house at the end of Lr Stephen Street. It was donated in 1734 by Mrs Mary Mercer for the purpose of the treatment of the sick poor and governors and directors appointed. It was fitted out thanks to a £50 donation by Dublin Corporation as well as further contributions and only had ten beds at the outset. The physicians and surgeons offered their services gratis. Further funding came in 1738 in the form of a legacy from Captain Hayes and the hospital was considerably extended, increasing its capacity to 62 beds. The building stands on the site of 13th century St Stephen’s leper Hospital. It was closed in 1983 when it was taken over as a hostel and library for the Royal College of Surgeons. The front of the building houses Mercer’s Health Centre, a general medical practice, travel health centre and international immunisation clinic. When the building was demolished in 1989 and a new one erected its frontage with some of the original stonework was retained. Mercer’s Hospital was extensively used by the Ambulance service during the Easter Week uprising.

Source:

Encyclopaedia of Dublin, Douglas Bennett, 2005

SIR PATRICK DUN’S HOSPITAL

Sir Patrick Dun’s Hospital was founded under a will of Sir Patrick Dun, a Scottish doctor who practiced in Dublin and bequeathed funds to the Royal College of Physicians of Ireland (RCPI). It was moved from Essex Quay in 1808 to the present site at Grand Canal Street. The building was designed by Sir Richard Morrison. It was used as a teaching hospital, training medical students & junior doctors from Trinity College Dublin until it was closed in 1987. The completely restored hospital buildings have been adapted for commercial use in recent years. The Tara Street Fire Brigade log book refers to Sir Patrick Dun’s Hospital about five times over the course of Easter Week when its ambulance left wounded there.

Source:

Encyclopaedia of Dublin, Douglas Bennett, 2005
“Sir Patrick Dun’s Table – An accidental War Memorial” – History Ireland, Vol. 22, No. 6, 2014, p.6.

ST VINCENT’S HOSPITAL

St. Vincent's Hospital was founded in 1834 on St Stephen’s Green, Dublin, by Mother Mary Aikenhead, foundress of the Roman Catholic order of Religious Sisters of Charity. The hospital was open to all who could afford its services, irrespective of their religious persuasion. Set up in the fine town house of the Earl of Meath, ‘one of the most noble mansions left tenantless after the Union’ on the east side of the fashionable square. Thanks to generous donations the hospital expanded and developed serving the public until it moved to its current site in Elm Park in 1970. In 1999 it was renamed St. Vincent's University Hospital (SVUH), to highlight its position as a principal teaching hospital of University College Dublin. SVUH serves as a regional centre for emergency medicine and medical care at an inpatient and outpatient level. The Tara Street Fire Brigade log book refers to St Vincent’s Hospital three times over the course of Easter Week when its ambulance left wounded & dead there.

Source:

Mary Aikenhead, Her Life, her work & her friends, S.A. (M.H. Gill & Son, Dublin 1882)

THE MATER HOSPITAL

The Mater Hospital or Mater Misericordiae University Hospital (MMUH) is a major teaching hospital, located on Eccles Street in Dublin’s north inner city. It was established in 1861 by the Sisters of Mercy as a Roman Catholic voluntary hospital. On the opening day it had accommodation for 40 patients. Five years later, during a cholera epidemic in 1866, it treated 248 patients in six weeks. It is now one of the largest hospitals in the country. It is associated with University College Dublin School of Medicine and provides national tertiary care in many branches of medicine, including cardiothoracic surgery, the National Spinal injuries unit, the national heart and lung transplant programme, the National Pulmonary Hypertension Unit among them. After Jervis Street and Mercer’s the Mater was the third busiest hospital in treating casualties of Easter Week’s fighting in 1916.

Source:

Encyclopaedia of Dublin, Douglas Bennett, 2005